Rugby: field positions

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Player Empowerment Rugby Gener...

We have open this thread to continue the discussion on Player Empowerment started in the Coaches Hot Tip in this month's newsletter. If you missed it, here it is again. There is no doubt that if you want your team to be successful, you need the players to make decisions on the pitch for themselves. We know that if a team is used to getting the answers to problems on the field from the coach, it will mean that they will hesitate and look to the touchline before commiting to an action and that, of course, will be far too late! The coach can still influence things but once the game has started it is a fairly minimal influence, during the game it must be the players who react to situations as they happen and make decisions immediatley. Therefore, it is essential to have leaders in the team who feel confident about making decisons in the heat of the battle. They need to know that even a wrong call is better than no call. They should feel that their coach will support them in making a call and, if it was not necesarily the best decision, will help them make a better one next time without being too critical. Ideally, the leaders and decision makers will be at key positions in the team where they can communicate with other players as well as influencing play themselves. Key positions are Numbers%3A 2; 4/5; 8; 9; 10 and 15. This is often referred to as "The Spine or Backbone" of the team. This is not to say that a good captain and leader can't be in another position but if they are, for instance an 11 or 14, they will need good co leaders in the key positions to communicate their decisions during a game. To develop this spine to operate as leaders, the coach should involve these players in discussions about how the team are playing - making them feel some ownership and responsibility for the teams performance. They could also be involved in unit practises, for instance the 2 and 8 could Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 occasionaly lead part of a line out practice, once the coach has agreed with them what the practice needs to achieve. The coach is not giving the players complete control but rather, allowing them to be involved in the process of team development. Obviously, the age and ability of your team can affect how far along this path you can go but, even with players as young as Under 8's, I have found that delegating some responsibility is a really effective way to build a cohesive and well functioning team! Let me know your thoughts on this type player empowerment. Good luck Simon

Archived User Coach

forwards positions in open pla...

Hello, in open play i want to have my forwards split up across the field not just chasing the next ruck. im not sure exactly how to teach them where they should be standing. (positional play) (Dane coles always seems to be a wing in open play)

dan Coach, Germany

Which defence system is the mo...

Which defence system is the most effective for 15-man rugby and what drills can I use for the rush/sliding defence...especially to get the guys in the inside to slide with and close up the inside gap from the 2nd phase onwards.

Rossi Marx Coach, South Africa

Under 8's drills%3A how to get...

Under 8's drills%3A how to get players to stay in position (in their channels) defensively to avoid them chasing the ball all over pitch! thanks, David

Archived User Coach

I am familiar with field positioning, play, and stategies?

I am familiar with field positioning, play, and stategies for the fowards but can anyone give me advice on how to pick a good flyhalf and scrum half. Also how to train them on making the best decisions on the pitch, for example when to pass out wide, how to relieve defensive pressure, when to kick, etc...? My backs are still new to rugby. Some have less than a year's experience and others are brand new to the sport.

William Barrett Coach, United States of America

Please can someone tell me the main differance in roles?

Please can someone tell me the main differance in the role of a loose head and tight head prop in a scrum?

Archived User Coach

u19 scrum rules

u19 scrum rules

Rob Middlehurst Coach, Bahrain

Making the full-back position an attractive proposition.

Making the full-back position an attractive proposition. Often over-looked, the full-back position is a vital player in anyones team if he is used and brought into the game. Does anyone have any technical/positional material to coach prospective players in this position?

Archived User Coach

Scoring tries - habit?

Why is it important to get players to score the try when completing a handling/running drill?

Archived User Coach

I have just started coaching touch at my school and?

I have just started coaching touch at my school and have been trying to find out about field positions. can anyone help me? i have only been doing drils at practice and now want to start having mini matches.

Archived User Coach

Scrum half approach to the ruck

I'm a new player trying to learn to play Scrum half. I have a general idea of how the game works having played back positions a few times. However, I'm confused about one thing (and this might be dumb but bear with me). The thing is, I'm pretty quick. I can usually make it to a ruck before the forwards have fully formed it. When this happens I don't really have a good sense of where to stand in order ot have good access to the ball but also avoid blocking other forwards coming in to ruck.  Usually I've already surveyed the field (to my newbie abilities anyway) and made a decision as to what I want to do with the ball, yelled the call on my way to the ruck, etc, so that puts me in a mindset that I REALLY want to be close to the ball so I can make it happen.  Should I just keep my distance instead until the ruck is fully formed? Where specifically should I be standing and how quickly should I get there? Thanks!

Archived User Coach

Law 12 - the forward pass or t...

The law says that a forward pass is one "thrown forward" "in the direction of the opponents' goal line" Does that mean that, if the ball is passed and the receiver catches it NEARER to the opponents goal line than from where the ball was passed that the pass was forward? (Leaving to one side any other touches of the ball that might have taken place.) Maybe an example is better. Player 1 passes the ball sideways - releasing it on the 22 metre line. Player 2 (with no other player having touched the ball), running from well behind the 22 metre line, catches the ball when it has travelled sideways but the ball is now 20 metres from the opponents goal line (2 metres further forward from the place that the ball was passed). Is that a forward pass or throw forward? And if not, why not?

Archived User Coach
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