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Defenders marking split landings

How does a defender know where to judge her 3 foot defensive stance when shooters opt for a simultaneous split landing?

In this situation the defender has to wait for the shooter to lift a foot (usually the one furthest from the post) and then get her legal distance from the remaining foot which is now the grounded foot as per the rules.  A split landing is no different to a two footed landing by any player - if both feet remain grounded it is the distance from the closest foot to the defender - if one foot is lifted and regrounded then it is from the foot that remained grounded.  On a split landing defenders should remain as close as possible to the goalie without actively defending or interefering to maintain a presence. If the goalie sets up to take a shot, immediately get distance from the correct foot and actively defend. Be ready for the goalie who may use the dummy shot, quick turn and double pass back move wherein the defender must close up the distance again very quickly to defend to pass back in.

The only other thing I would add is the defender will not be pulled up for obstruction if they keep their arms down.  I coach my 11yo's to ensure their shoulders are back, arms are down running beside their side and hands tucked behind them.

As an umpire, I don't pull defenders up if they are standing in front of the attacking player, but not defending (hence the shoulders back and arms close).

Good luck

as Janet has already explained, this is true, that they dont need to move unless they are impeding the shooters shooting action.  its even more difficult for a defender to get their 3 feet if the shooter knows how to pivot on their heal as the 3 feet is measured from the closest point to the defender...which is normally the toe.  so the shooter can split and gain a certain distance from the split, then push down their heal (which is now what the defender is trying to measure their distance from to defend the shot that is about to be set up) and the shooter then pivots on their heal and turns and now have gain more distance towards the goal ring, and the defender is now more likely to be called for obstruction as they are now too close to the defender as their marker has now been moved.

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