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Looking for information on 1442 and 11333 systems...

information on 1442 and 11333 systems.

I am fairly new to sportplan so hopefully someone can point me in the right direction. I am from Australia so know the GK-2-3-5 set up well. I would like to possibly employ a GK-4-4-2 / GK -1-3-4-2 set up or a GK-1-3-3-3.

What I need is information on

How players are set up, Forward press set ups, defencive zone set ups and attacking methods. For a bonus it would be great to know how they set up against a GK-2-3-5 as most of our oposition teams play this or a gk-2-3-3-2

Cheers 

Hi Keith, 

At what point do you assess the formations you mention above?

In possession, when defending or at the point of transition?

If I stop a match tape I can find any number of formations: what do these numbers really mean?  To give a little history the 1:3:3:3 formation was developed as a result of the instigation of man to man marking, this in turn resulted from better physical conditioning (if you can get hold of a copy look at the advanced Science of Hockey - Horst Wein.)

What used to make international hockey so interesting was the different styles adopted by the leading teams but with globilisation and the availability of match highlighs etc on the internet the styles across the globe have come closer together: having said that; scratch an Aussie and you'll find a zone approach lies at the heart of their hockey. Scratch a German and man to man marking will be the heart of individual responsibilities when the crunch comes.

If you try and adopt man to man marking (sweeper and three) with Aussie's you'll find it goes against their upbringing. I would in short concentrate my efforts on making small changes to players roles. If using numbers helps describe what you're after, use them by all means but numbers won't in themselves provide a solution.

What is significant, is that the most successful teams in the world have the least confusion in their approach: they believe in their general method (strategy) and tweek roles (tactics) according to their strengths and opponents weaknesses. 

 

 

 

 

 

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  • or access our tried and tested plans